WEAR SHERLOCK: A blog that focuses on the wardrobe and props featured in the BBC show 'Sherlock', starring Benedict Cumberbatch, Martin Freeman and Mark Gatiss.

This blog showcases the clothing and props seen in the show as well as providing links as to where to buy them. We often host giveaways and you can check our current giveaway status here. We also sell high quality Sherlock shirts and mugs!

100% UNOFFICIAL - Not affiliated with the BBC

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Pair of Antique German Chromolithographs
As seen here in 221b in Series 1 and 2 

1894, ‘Pilze I’ & ‘Pilze II’ - Poisonous/edible mushroom plates (10 x 8 inch)
Currently sold out / Purchased here and here from vintage-views.com

For more prints/art/photography from 221b check our our wall art tag.



View of Delft by Johannes Vermeer.
The original “Lost Vermeer” painting from The Great Game.

View of Delft was painted by Vermeer between 1660 and 1661 and shows a view of the artist’s hometown. It is an oil on canvas and is currently housed in The Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis in The Hague. Perhaps Vermeer’s most popular painting is Girl with a Pearl Earring.

Sherlock’s production designers have recreated the original painting to show a night scene, cutting out a portion from the top and bottom of the canvas. They have kept the cityscape almost identical.



As previously posted in our expansion on this Radio Times article, Sherlock’s production designer Arwel Wyn Jones has said of Moriarty’s magpie seal (seen on the envelopes he left as clues in The Reichenbach Fall) that:

The magpie seal was inspired by the music playing on Moriarty’s headphones as he staged his daring break-ins.

That piece of music was taken from Rossini’s “La Gazza Ladra” opera (The Theiving Magpie). As can be seen above, the stamp used was directly inspired by a CD cover of a live recording of the opera. 

If you’d like to incorporate Moriarty’s magpie seal into your graphics (or just use it in general), aliceinhatland has recreated the design and made it available to download as a FREE Photoshop brush. You can download it here.

The brush is also the correct dimensions for creating your own wax seal at www.customwaxnseals.com



Sherlock’s bedroom Portraits, a Study (2 of 2)DIMITRI MENDELEEV 1834 - 1907    - Seen here on Sherlock’s wall.
Dimitri Mendeleev was a Russian chemist, inventor and Doctor of Science widely known to be responsible for creating the Periodic Table of the Elements. At the time that Mendeleev created his table, not all chemical elements had been discovered so he left spaces within it along with predicted properties that they would have. He was successful in his predictions and when the elements were discovered they fitted perfectly into the spaces he had left in his table. 
It’s obvious to any Holmes fan as to why Sherlock would idolise a man such as Mendeleev. Sherlock’s interest in the Periodic Table he created is made visible by his framed print of it also seen on his bedroom wall, here. 
Mendeleev’s portrait on Sherlock’s wall was taken in 1897. A high-res copy can be seen online here.

Sherlock’s bedroom Portraits, a Study (2 of 2)
DIMITRI MENDELEEV 1834 - 1907
    - Seen here on Sherlock’s wall.

Dimitri Mendeleev was a Russian chemist, inventor and Doctor of Science widely known to be responsible for creating the Periodic Table of the Elements. At the time that Mendeleev created his table, not all chemical elements had been discovered so he left spaces within it along with predicted properties that they would have. He was successful in his predictions and when the elements were discovered they fitted perfectly into the spaces he had left in his table. 

It’s obvious to any Holmes fan as to why Sherlock would idolise a man such as Mendeleev. Sherlock’s interest in the Periodic Table he created is made visible by his framed print of it also seen on his bedroom wall, here

Mendeleev’s portrait on Sherlock’s wall was taken in 1897.
A high-res copy can be seen online here.



Sherlock’s bedroom Portraits, a Study (1 of 2)EDGAR ALLAN POE 1809 - 1849    - Seen here on Sherlock’s wall.
As previously mentioned, the portrait of Poe seen in Sherlock’s bedroom is a subtle link added to the set by the show’s creators in tribute to the original inspiration of the Sherlock Holmes stories. Poe’s detective character C. Auguste Dupin was the inspiration for Arthur Conan Doyle’s Holmes and is known to be the first ever fictional detective. Sir Arthur described Poe as:

"the father of the detective tale. [He] covered its limits so completely that I fail to see how his followers can find any fresh ground which they can confidently call their own.”

In the Sherlock Holmes books themselves, Poe’s Dupin is mentioned by ACD. In A Study in Scarlet Watson writes:

"It is simple enough as you explain it," I said, smiling. "You remind me of Edgar Allan Poe’s Dupin. I had no idea that such individuals did exist outside of stories." Sherlock Holmes rose and lit his pipe. “No doubt you think that you are complimenting me in comparing me to Dupin,” he observed. “Now, in my opinion, Dupin was a very inferior fellow. That trick of his of breaking in on his friends’ thoughts with an apropos remark after a quarter of an hour’s silence is really very showy and superficial. He had some analytical genius, no doubt; but he was by no means such a phenomenon as Poe appeared to imagine.”

If you’d like to read more about the influence Poe’s writings had on Arthur Conan Doyle and see a comprehensive comparison of the similarities in both of their texts you can read a wonderful online essay by Drew R. Thomas here: Part One | Part Two
The portrait of Poe (a daguerreotype) is available in a larger size here. The image is titled “Ultima Thule" and was taken a year before Poe’s death. For more information on the print itself and how it was created please see our previous ask-answer on the portrait here.

Sherlock’s bedroom Portraits, a Study (1 of 2)
EDGAR ALLAN POE 1809 - 1849
    - Seen here on Sherlock’s wall.

As previously mentioned, the portrait of Poe seen in Sherlock’s bedroom is a subtle link added to the set by the show’s creators in tribute to the original inspiration of the Sherlock Holmes stories. Poe’s detective character C. Auguste Dupin was the inspiration for Arthur Conan Doyle’s Holmes and is known to be the first ever fictional detective. Sir Arthur described Poe as:

"the father of the detective tale. [He] covered its limits so completely that I fail to see how his followers can find any fresh ground which they can confidently call their own.”

In the Sherlock Holmes books themselves, Poe’s Dupin is mentioned by ACD. In A Study in Scarlet Watson writes:

"It is simple enough as you explain it," I said, smiling. "You remind me of Edgar Allan Poe’s Dupin. I had no idea that such individuals did exist outside of stories."

Sherlock Holmes rose and lit his pipe. “No doubt you think that you are complimenting me in comparing me to Dupin,” he observed. “Now, in my opinion, Dupin was a very inferior fellow. That trick of his of breaking in on his friends’ thoughts with an apropos remark after a quarter of an hour’s silence is really very showy and superficial. He had some analytical genius, no doubt; but he was by no means such a phenomenon as Poe appeared to imagine.”

If you’d like to read more about the influence Poe’s writings had on Arthur Conan Doyle and see a comprehensive comparison of the similarities in both of their texts you can read a wonderful online essay by Drew R. Thomas here: Part One | Part Two

The portrait of Poe (a daguerreotype) is available in a larger size here. The image is titled “Ultima Thule" and was taken a year before Poe’s death. For more information on the print itself and how it was created please see our previous ask-answer on the portrait here.



The Great Falls of the Reichenbach, by William Turner (1804) Recovered by Sherlock in The Reichenbach Fall 
27 x 40 inches. Portrait. £25 - £145 (depending on size) / Prints available from here. 

The Great Falls of the Reichenbach, by William Turner (1804) 
Recovered by Sherlock in The Reichenbach Fall 

27 x 40 inches. Portrait. 
£25 - £145 (depending on size) / Prints available from here



Screen accurate recreation - ‘H.O.U.N.D Liberty, In’ shirt/hoodie
As seen in The Hounds of Baskerville

Heather Grey material, available in sizes S - 3XL.
SHIRT MENS/SKINNY FIT: £18 / HOODIE: £30  
Available here at our new RedBubble store!

Design recreated by our chief graphic designer. The Heather Grey texture is the same as the fabric from the episode. Original design copyright to the BBC.



Simple and clean periodic table of the chemical elementsAs seen on Sherlock’s bedroom wall in A Scandal in Belgravia 
Designed especially for the show by the art department.Free! / Right click+save as to download!(Recreated and submitted to wearsherlock by anonymous)

Simple and clean periodic table of the chemical elements
As seen on Sherlock’s bedroom wall in A Scandal in Belgravia 

Designed especially for the show by the art department.
Free! / Right click+save as to download!
(Recreated and submitted to wearsherlock by anonymous)



Magnae Britanniae et Hiberniae Tabula original map by William Blaeu As seen in 221b in Series 1 & 2 (here) 
50 x 38cm. Framed in gold moulding. £1,200 / $1,851 Available here at jmaps.co.uk Prints also available for purchase at probertencyclopaedia.com  

Magnae Britanniae et Hiberniae Tabula original map by William Blaeu 
As seen in 221b in Series 1 & 2 (here

50 x 38cm. Framed in gold moulding. 
£1,200 / $1,851 Available here at jmaps.co.uk 
Prints also available for purchase at probertencyclopaedia.com  



Shodan (初段) Judo diploma certificate
Seen in Sherlock’s bedroom in A Scandal in Belgravia

First rank Judo certificate, presented to Sherlock Holmes
( シャーロック・ホームズ )
Priceless / Available if you’re presented with the first Dan degree in Judo